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Family Process Heft 1/2010
1/2010 - 2/2010 - 3/2010 - 4/2010 - Überblick


Imber-Black, Evan (2010): Editorial: Reading Outside the Page. In: Family Process 49 (1): S. 1-3


Weingarten, Kaethe (2010): Reasonable Hope: Construct, Clinical Applications, and Supports. In: Family Process 49 (1): S. 5-25.

abstract: Hope may be the most laden shorthand term of all time. Everyone wants it; few know how to articulate what it is. Although family therapists frequently work to restore hope with hopeless families, they have contributed little to the abundant literature on hope. I present a new conceptualization of hope—reasonable hope—that reflects how family therapists think and practice. By subscribing to reasonable hope, clinicians enhance their ability to offer accompaniment and bear witness to clients. I describe clinical practices that, informed by reasonable hope, also facilitate its cocreation. Finally, I suggest supports for clinicians who practice reasonable hope.


Samuels, Gina Miranda (2010): Building Kinship and Community: Relational Processes of Bicultural Identity Among Adult Multiracial Adoptees. In: Family Process 49 (1): S. 26-42.

abstract: This study uses the case of transracially adopted multiracial adults to highlight an alternative family context and thus process of African American enculturation. Interpretive analyses of interviews with 25 adult multiracial adoptees produced 4 patterns in their bicultural identity formation: (1) claiming whiteness culturally but not racially, (2) learning to „be Black“—peers as agents of enculturation, (3) biological pathways to authentic Black kinship, and (4) bicultural kinship beyond Black and White. Conceptualizing race as an ascribed extended kinship network and using notions of „groundedness“ from bicultural identity literature, the relational aspects of participants‘ identity development are highlighted. Culturally relevant concepts of bicultural identity are proposed for practice with multiracial adoptees who have multiple cultures of origin and for whom White mainstream culture is transmitted intrafamilially as a first culture.


Lee, Way-Yung, Man-Lung Ng, Ben K L Cheung & Joyce Wa Yung (2010): Capturing Children‘s Response to Parental Conflict and Making Use of It. In: Family Process 49 (1): S. 43-58.

abstract: The aim of our study is to examine the interface between children‘s physiological changes and the specificities of parental conflict, and to develop a procedure in which such information can be shared with the family for therapeutic change. Children from 20 families were exposed to parental conflict discussion (CD) while their arousals were measured through skin conductance and heart rate sensors. It was found that regardless of the subject of the argument, 80% of the time they were complaining about each other. Likewise, 80% of the time the children were responding to the parents‘ own interpersonal tension, including moments of silence. The protocol established for the study, consisting of CD and debriefing, was found to be a powerful tool in moving parents toward conflict resolution.


Ippolito Morrill, Melinda, Denise A. Hines, Sehar Mahmood & James V. Córdova (2010): Pathways Between Marriage and Parenting for Wives and Husbands: The Role of Coparenting. In: Family Process 49 (1): S. 59-73.

abstract: As family systems research has expanded, so have investigations into how marital partners coparent together. Although coparenting research has increasingly found support for the influential role of coparenting on both marital relationships and parenting practices, coparenting has traditionally been investigated as part of an indirect system which begins with marital health, is mediated by coparenting processes, and then culminates in each partner‘s parenting. The field has not tested how this traditional model compares with the equally plausible alternative model, in which coparenting simultaneously predicts both marital relationships and parenting practices. Furthermore, statistical and practical limitations have typically resulted in only one parent being analyzed in these models. This study used model-fitting analyses to include both wives and husbands in a test of these two alternative models of the role of coparenting in the family system. Our data suggested that both the traditional indirect model (marital health to coparenting to parenting practices), and the alternative predictor model where coparenting alliance directly and simultaneously predicts marital health and parenting practices, fit for both spouses. This suggests that dynamic and multiple roles may be played by coparenting in the overall family system, and raises important practical implications for family clinicians.


Spagnola, Mary & Barbara Fiese (2010): Preschoolers with Asthma: Narratives of Family Functioning Predict Behavior Problems. In: Family Process 49 (1): S. 74-91.

abstract: As family systems research has expanded, so have investigations into how marital partners coparent together. Although coparenting research has increasingly found support for the influential role of coparenting on both marital relationships and parenting practices, coparenting has traditionally been investigated as part of an indirect system which begins with marital health, is mediated by coparenting processes, and then culminates in each partner‘s parenting. The field has not tested how this traditional model compares with the equally plausible alternative model, in which coparenting simultaneously predicts both marital relationships and parenting practices. Furthermore, statistical and practical limitations have typically resulted in only one parent being analyzed in these models. This study used model-fitting analyses to include both wives and husbands in a test of these two alternative models of the role of coparenting in the family system. Our data suggested that both the traditional indirect model (marital health to coparenting to parenting practices), and the alternative predictor model where coparenting alliance directly and simultaneously predicts marital health and parenting practices, fit for both spouses. This suggests that dynamic and multiple roles may be played by coparenting in the overall family system, and raises important practical implications for family clinicians.


Stadelmann, Stephanie, Sonja Perren, Maureen Groeben & Kai von Klitzing (2010): Parental Separation and Children‘s Behavioral/Emotional Problems: The Impact of Parental Representations and Family Conflict. In: Family Process 49 (1): S. 92-108.

abstract: In this longitudinal study, we examine whether the effect of parental separation on kindergarten children‘s behavioral/emotional problems varies according to the level of family conflict, and children‘s parental representations. One hundred and eighty seven children were assessed at ages 5 and 6. Family conflict was assessed using parents‘ ratings. Children‘s parental representations were assessed using a story-stem task. A multiinformant approach (parent, teacher, child) was employed to assess children‘s behavioral/emotional problems. Bivariate results showed that separation, family conflict, and negative parental representations were associated with children‘s behavioral/emotional problems. However, in multivariate analyses, when controlling for gender and symptoms at age 5, we found that children of separated parents who showed negative parental representations had a significantly greater increase in conduct problems between 5 and 6 than all other children. In terms of emotional symptoms and hyperactivity, symptoms at 5 and (for hyperactivity only) gender were the only predictors for symptoms 1 year later. Our results suggest that kindergarten children‘s representations of parent-child relationships moderate the impact of parental separation on the development of conduct problems, and underline play and narration as a possible route to access the thoughts and feelings of young children faced with parental separation.


Garfield, Robert (2010): Male Emotional Intimacy: How Therapeutic Men‘s Groups Can Enhance Couples Therapy. In: Family Process 49 (1): S. 109-122.

abstract: Men‘s difficulty with emotional intimacy is a problem that therapists regularly encounter in working with heterosexual couples in therapy. The first part of this article describes historical and cultural factors that contribute to this dilemma in men‘s marriages and same-sex friendships. Therapeutic men‘s groups can provide a corrective experience for men, helping them to develop emotional intimacy skills while augmenting their work in couples therapy. A model for such groups is presented, including guidelines for referral, screening, and collaboration with other therapists. Our therapeutic approach encourages relationship-based learning through direct emotional expression and supportive feedback. We emphasize the development of friendship skills, core attributes of friendship (connection, communication, commitment, and cooperation) that contribute to emotional intimacy in men‘s relationships. Case examples are included to illustrate how this model works in clinical practice, as well as specific suggestions for further study that could lead to a more evidence-based practice.


Rober, Peter & Michael R. Seltzer (2010): Avoiding Colonizer Positions in the Therapy Room: Some Ideas About the Challenges of Dealing with the Dialectic of Misery and Resources in Families. In: Family Process 49 (1): S. 123-137.

abstract: Some authors have argued that certain acts of family therapists—despite their best intentions—may represent a form of colonizing the family. When acting as a colonizer, a therapist is understood as becoming overly responsible for the family and focusing too strongly on change. In so doing, the therapist disrespects the family‘s pace, and neglects their own resources for change. This paper aims to highlight the need for therapists to be hypersensitive both to the resources of families entering therapy as well as to the impact of prevailing ideologies on their own positioning in the session. The kind of sensitivity advocated here is dialectical in the sense that every family is understood as having potentials promoting dynamism, happiness, and well-being as well as potentials contributing to stagnation, unhappiness, and misery. In this article, using illustrations from clinical practice, we present some ideas for resisting the tendency by the therapist to assume a colonizing position as a professional solver of problems for families. Our main aim here is to redirect the therapist toward connecting with the family‘s suffering, as well as with the resource repertoire it has developed for navigating and negotiating its way through life.



(Published by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons)



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